Oranga Tamariki and Maori Whanau Wellbeing

NZAP press release

Minister for Children, Honourable Tracey Martin, stated on RNZ recently that Oranga Tamariki would have to partner with Iwi to provide safe homes for children in state care. Children’s Commissioner Andrew Becroft called this “a revolution in the way the State honours Treaty obligations with Māori in respect with care of children”.

New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists Spokesperson, Lynne Holdem, said: “NZAP welcomes the direction of this morning’s announcement and Oranga Tamariki’s commitment to consult with iwi regarding the tamariki apparently in need of care and protection.”

“Psychotherapists hope that the new policies are resourced with sufficient funding to allow iwi, and other community organisations, to pay providers and clinicians skilled and knowledgeable in matauranga Māori and in family therapy, trauma resolution and attachment behaviour,” Holdem said.

“Tertiary education systems need to do better to prepare health practitioners to respond much more competently to the needs of whanau Maori, tamariki and mokopuna. Building health workforce capability begins at our training institutions.”

“Many therapists trained in Family Therapy are now at retirement age. Training institutions such as the Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy training at AUT offer preparation for the kind of early intensive intervention that is needed but predominantly Pakeha graduates may still lack ability to connect with Maori and do not have the deep experience and knowledge that makes for true cultural competency. Courses like this need to be funded elsewhere in Aotearoa and young people given incentives to attend them,” said Holdem.

“A greater investment in Kaupapa Maori research, curriculum development and design to produce the workforce could bring about change and greater accountability from professionals and organisations in terms of Te Tiriti obligations and a preparedness for Maori led initiatives. When this becomes much more visible in our society perhaps then and only then will Maori be able to trust in the services provided,” stated Holdem.

“We are calling for investment in resources and training so vulnerable parents and families, are supported by psychotherapists, counsellors and social workers who have an understanding of the value of Maori tikanaga, matauranga and whakapapa to heal trauma and can also recognise the needs of each whanau and make interventions that are skilled and culturally attuned,” she continued.

“Many uplifted children, in State care, have difficult behaviours as a result of neglect and trauma so whanau or caregivers need training from child and family therapists to manage emotional escalations in order to give the child a chance to develop secure attachment. This can happen in settings where both the mother and the children are uplifted and the mother supported to address her own trauma and develop reflective capacity and the ability to respond to the needs signalled by the child. Kaupapa Maori organisations, such as Tu Tama Wahine o Taranaki or Hoki ki to Rito in South Auckland, could be resourced to provide the intensive wrap around services required by these whanau,” she went on to say.

“A damaged child comes from a damaged whanau and the whole whanau needs a combination of support to enable them to address their basic needs, resolve addiction issues and heal from traumatic experiences so that they may have a greater sense of agency and whanau capability to provide safe home environments for tamariki and mokopuna,” said Holdem.

“NZAP supports the new revolution in Oranga Tamariki and recognises Māori iwi will develop their own responses to help and heal their whanau. Let us hope that government is able to provide sufficient funding for this to be the kind of early, intensive, and wrap around service that will prevent further State uplift of tamariki,” she stated.

Clinical Team Leader, Refugee Mental Health and Wellbeing, Auckland

Clinical Team Leader Vacancy

Your opportunity to be part of supporting refugees as they arrive and settle in New Zealand

Refugees as Survivors New Zealand is seeking a Clinical Team Leader who is passionate about working in this dynamic area and contributing to the successful resettlement of newly arrived and resettled refugees in New Zealand.

OUR SERVICE

Refugees as Survivors New Zealand (RASNZ) provides specialist mental health, assessment, treatment and referral services for all incoming United Nations Quota Refugees. RASNZ functions as a national resource for those involved with refugees, asylum seekers and victims of torture and severe trauma.

We also provide specialist mental health and wellbeing services to anybody from a former refugee background who has settled in Auckland.

The Clinical Team Leader oversees and supports staff in the day-to-day clinical operations of the agency and manages liaison with partner agencies onsite at Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre. In addition to providing leadership and coordination, the Clinical Team Leader has a direct clinical role and works with clients in individual, family and group contexts. The work is challenging, varied and highly rewarding for those wishing to work in a diverse, multi-cultural environment as part of a committed and passionate team.

Position is full time – closing date Friday 5th July 2019.

SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED

  • A high level of competence in the assessment and treatment of clients who have experienced trauma
  • Experience managing clinical teams in the community
  • A background in working with culturally and linguistically diverse clients
  • The ability to liaise and work with a range of organisations and agencies at the Resettlement Centre and in the community
  • The confidence to participate in research, capacity building and training for staff from other agencies who work with refugee clients
  • Capacity to form collaborative relationships with professional colleagues, carers, relatives, and clients
  • Evidence of ability to formulate and articulate sound judgements based on analysis and interpretation of a range of complex information in clinical work, drawing both on clinical observation and relevant theoretical models
  • New Zealand professional body registration
  • Post graduate clinical qualification
  • Experience with children and young people an advantage
  • Five + years’ experience post qualification

We offer a generous professional development and annual leave package alongside a competitive salary.

DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED

  • CV
  • Cover letter
  • Copy of NZ Registration
  • Two referees
  • Applicants for this position should have NZ residency or a valid NZ work visa

Contact: Denise@rasnz.co.nz or phone (09) 270 0870

Oranga Tamariki – the health of children

NZAP press release

The health of children depends on having safe, supportive structures around them.

In Te Ao Māori, the child is born of its parents, but belongs to the entire whānau. They are a taonga, someone to be celebrated and supported into their adulthood, where they can continue to contribute to their whānau, hapū and iwi. An uplift of a child from within their whānau severely disrupts this process.

The connection of an infant to their parents is of paramount importance. For Māori, so is the child’s ability to know and connect to their whānau, hapū and iwi, their whenua (ancestral lands), their whakapapa (ancestry), and their mātauranga Māori (indigenous knowledge). In line with the emphasis of holism in Te Ao Māori, these connections are vital to the development of a Māori child. When a child is uplifted and placed outside of their whanau their access to these supportive connections becomes extremely compromised.

State interference has impeded Māori whanau for over a century – the Native Schools Act (1867) and the Tohunga Suppression Act (1907) are examples of legislature which affected the way Māori lived in a rapidly changing Aotearoa. We also acknowledge the findings of Puao-te-Atatū (1988) which outlined severe deficiencies and concerns within the state’s care of children.

It is necessary that crown entities such as Oranga Tamariki think deeply about how they support tamariki within their whānau, hapū and iwi. When children experience loss and grief at an early age, this trauma often has ongoing effects on their health, wellbeing and development throughout the course of their lives. It is vital to remember that in the pursuit of safety, we not perpetuate other serious harm in the process.

Anna Fleming – Psychotherapist

Member, Waka Oranga, National Collective of Māori Psychotherapy Practitioners & NZ Association of Psychotherapists

Mental Health Clinician, Palmerston North

V042 MH Clinician – Comm Corrections May 2019

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN, COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SITE, PALMERSTON NORTH

Clinical Psychologist, Psychotherapist, OT, Psychiatric Nurse

  • Role based at Community Corrections Site, Palmerston North
  • Competitive, market-based remuneration package
  • Challenging and rewarding role, with a service development component

Pact is a major provider of community-based mental health services across Southland, Otago, West Coast and the Lower North Island. We are seeking an experienced health professional with a solid track record to deliver the Improving Mental Health Service within prison sites.

As a champion of the service, you will provide clinical mental health assessments, planning and treatment to offenders who experience a mental illness. In this role you will deliver mental health training workshops for the corrections health teams and wider workforce.

This full-time position is for a fixed term period expiring on 29 February 2020. However, prior to this date our service contract will be reviewed for consideration of a further extension or to be made permanent.

In order to apply you must be a registered health professional with a current practicing certificate and competent experience in mental health assessment, treatment and therapy.

The position offers the opportunity to develop the role within the prison health team as well as developing the service region-wide, with strong organisational and clinical support from your employer.

For more role specific information, contact David Bradley, General Manager, on (04) 560 5423

Please complete an application form from our website‘s employment section quoting reference V042 before 9.00am, Friday, 31 May 2019

We greatly appreciate the time and effort taken to submit your individual application. However, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Mental Health Clinician, Upper Hutt

V041 MH Clinician – Corrections May 2019

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN, RIMUTAKA AND AROHATA PRISONS

Clinical Psychologist, Psychotherapist, OT, Psychiatric Nurse

  • Role based at Rimutaka and Arohata Prisons, Upper Hutt
  • Competitive, market-based remuneration package
  • Challenging and rewarding role, with a service development component

Pact is a major provider of community-based mental health services across Southland, Otago, West Coast and the Lower North Island. We are seeking an experienced health professional with a solid track record to deliver the Improving Mental Health Service within prison sites.

As a champion of the service, you will provide clinical mental health assessments, planning and treatment to offenders who experience a mental illness. In this role you will deliver mental health training workshops for the corrections health teams and wider workforce.

This full-time position is for a fixed term period expiring on 29 February 2020. However, prior to this date our service contract will be reviewed for consideration of a further extension or to be made permanent.

In order to apply you must be a registered health professional with a current practicing certificate and competent experience in mental health assessment, treatment and therapy.

The position offers the opportunity to develop the role within the prison health team as well as developing the service region-wide, with strong organisational and clinical support from your employer.

For more role specific information, contact David Bradley, General Manager, on (04) 560 5423

Please complete an application form from our website‘s employment section quoting reference V041 before 9.00am, Friday, 31 May 2019.

We greatly appreciate the time and effort taken to submit your individual application. However, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Call to strengthen the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill

NZAP Press Release, May 2019

“The New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists stand with other professional organisations to support the government’s Zero Carbon bill and the commission to monitor and set standards of greenhouse gases. We ask that the government announce a Climate Crisis and shorten the goal for Zero Carbon to 10 years.” says Lynne Holdem, of the New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists.

The timing and necessity of lowering carbon emissions is vital for the stabilisation of weather patterns and to sustain life on our planet. As reported by the recent United Nations, the world has approximately 12 years to limit the warming of the planet to 1.5 degrees Celsius. After this the environmental damage will be catastrophic.

“Often people are faced with overwhelming feelings when it comes to climate change, which, if left unchecked can lead to denial, inaction, and eventually despair at ever being able to change the situation. However, becoming politically active, joining an environmental organisation, making lifestyle changes are within the reach of everyone” said Holdem.

“As Psychotherapists, we are familiar with the negative effects of denial and overwhelm which are often seen in clinical situations. However, facing the truth will enable us to mobilise our anxiety in a positive way to produce change. The necessary ingredient for this to happen is being able to become aware of what is happening and talk with others about what we understand and feel. When we find connection together, we receive energy from each other. This can engage our will and create the political, social and personal change that a crisis requires” said Holdem.

“It’s good for our mental health as well as the environment to face reality and take action” she added.

 

Lynne Holdem

NZAP Public Issues

Ph: 027480 3523

Lynneholdem@gmail.com

 

Call for psychotherapists to talk about countertransference experiences

Are you a psychotherapist working with individuals who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder?

My name is Kristin Reilly and I am a Clinical Psychology Doctoral student at the University of Auckland.

As part of my research, I will be interviewing therapists about their experience of countertransference when working with clients who have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Your experience will contribute to training in this area.

The interview will take between 50 and 90 minutes and will be conducted in a location of your choice.

I am seeking psychotherapists with at least 3 years’ experience as a psychotherapist.

For more information, please contact Kristin Reilly at: krei739@aucklanduni.ac.nz

This study is being conducted by Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student, Kristin Reilly (krei739@aucklanduni.ac.nz) and is supervised by Dr Claire Cartwright (c.cartwright@auckland.ac.nz) at The University of Auckland.

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 7th June 2018 for three years. Reference number 021316.

Finding Compassion in a Dark Day – NZAP press release

15 March 2019

New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists (NZAP) acknowledge the shock and grief of the Moslem communities of Aotearoa and affected communities of Christchurch.  Particularly we wish to acknowledge the suffering of the families of the forty New Zealand citizens who have had their lives cut short and the trauma of the helpers and witnesses.

“While recognising the violence of this shocking incident, and sharing in the community of grief, it is important to call on the generous and loving aspects of our humanity. Let’s hope journalists, politicians and all New Zealanders active on social media, focus on the safety and comfort of the survivors, the heroism of the police, the compassion of St Johns medics and citizens who came to help, rather than the lives and ideas of perpetrators of this crime. Copy cat crimes can be a risk following events of this kind,” said Lynne Holdem, Public Issues spokesperson for NZAP.

Guidelines prepared by the Public Affairs of the American Psychoanalytic Association show the way to reduce such risks, continued Holdem.  https://www.reportingonmassshootings.org/

“Socially isolated individuals, preoccupied with resentment or hatred and wanting to gain “celebrity status” can be influenced by media coverage that gives exposure to the perpetrators and focuses on  details of the shooting.  Young men who are struggling with thoughts of suicide and homicide may use news reports and video to feed their own shadowy fantasies.” Holdem added. 

“We are generally a compassionate and peace loving people and lets hope we remain this way. When communities reach out to isolated people on our margins, they become safer as they feel more belonging and more connection to others. It is easy, when we aren’t threatened, to be kind and hold awareness of the needs of others and treat other people with respect. When under stress, or up against polarising views, it is much harder not to be reactive or retributive, and to hold to our values of good will peace and justice. 

Courageous Taranaki tangata whenua, under the severest of threats from colonising forces, remained strong and committed to non-violence. In March 1880 as the government prepared its attack on Parihaka, Te Whiti o Rongomai said  ‘Though some, in darkness of heart, seeing their land ravished, might wish to take arms and kill the aggressors, I say it must not be.’ Let’s remember Te Whiti, in these dark days. 

Lynne Holdem

Public Issues Portfolio

New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists

lynneholdem@gmail.com

Mobile: 0274803523

Part time counsellor, Well Elder, Wellington

Counsellor position description – Wellington February 2019

We are looking for a new appointment to work across Wellington and Porirua area as part of a team of three contracted counsellors. 

Applications to janetr@wellelder.nz by 5pm on Monday 11 March 2019

Please provide letter and CV

www.wellelder.nz for information, enquiries to 04 380 2440

Position Description

Purpose of Position

To provide high quality, professional counselling for individuals, couples, families, and groups as scheduled by WellElder. This includes assessment, short-term counselling, the fostering of client self-understanding and resourcefulness, and the ensuring of client safety and confidentiality, and appropriate referrals and follow ups.

To practise in a way which upholds WellElder’s values and goals and demonstrates an awareness of the needs of older people, Maori and people of a range of cultures.

To be part of WellElder team and participate in regular staff meetings and development, and input to policy, Board meetings and events as able.

The responsibilities of this position may change over time as the organisation responds to changing organisational and client need.

Accountable to:  WellElder Clinical Leader and Manager. 

Hours of Work: WellElder is open Tuesday to Thursdays, with some availability for home visits and groups on other days.

It is expected the contractor will make themselves available for one day a week, preferably Tuesdays, with some flexibility to extend if necessary.

Place of work: A combination of our counselling room at Newtown, and Johnsonville Community Centre and Pember House in Porirua.

Personal attributes:

  • Interested in working with older people.
  • Good communication skills, and flexible approaches to meeting client need.
  • Maturity and integrity in treating others with respect.
  • Excellent organisational and time management skills.
  • A willingness to continually learn and develop.
  • Ability to work independently and also as part of a team.
  • Interested in working less than full time. 

Qualifications and requirements:

  • A current NZAC or NZAP Practising Certificate and a knowledge, understanding and commitment to professional standards and ethics.
  • Training and experience in counselling, and group work.
  • A driver’s licence and the use of a car, as up to a half of counselling sessions take place in clients’ homes.
  • Ability to attend and participate in monthly staff meetings (usually in Wellington.)
  • Accurate and up-to-date record-keeping.
  • Competent Microsoft Outlook calendar use for scheduling appointments.
  • Participation in regular supervision with a qualified supervisor.
  • An awareness of Health and Safety practices in workplaces.
  • Hold Professional Indemnity Insurance.

Vacancies: Lecturer, Psychotherapy Programmes, AUT

We are seeking Lecturers who will aid the delivery of teaching and learning experiences for students enrolled on psychotherapy programmes, engage in research and enhance the Discipline’s capacity for postgraduate research and supervision, and provide leadership to and linkages with the national and international psychotherapy community. The Lecturer acts as a facilitator for student learning, delivering high quality psychotherapy teaching and learning experiences on-campus and within community and health service environments. They actively contribute to the critical study of psychotherapy and nurture future scholars and clinicians. They offer experience, innovation and leadership to the psychotherapy community. Effective performance will result in maximising students’ potential, enhancing the research profile of psychotherapy and enhancing the critical and innovative capacity of the discipline nationally and internationally.

For further information, including the position description, and to apply, please see the following:

https://careers.aut.ac.nz/academic?page=0