Mental Health Clinician, Palmerston North

V042 MH Clinician – Comm Corrections May 2019

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN, COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SITE, PALMERSTON NORTH

Clinical Psychologist, Psychotherapist, OT, Psychiatric Nurse

  • Role based at Community Corrections Site, Palmerston North
  • Competitive, market-based remuneration package
  • Challenging and rewarding role, with a service development component

Pact is a major provider of community-based mental health services across Southland, Otago, West Coast and the Lower North Island. We are seeking an experienced health professional with a solid track record to deliver the Improving Mental Health Service within prison sites.

As a champion of the service, you will provide clinical mental health assessments, planning and treatment to offenders who experience a mental illness. In this role you will deliver mental health training workshops for the corrections health teams and wider workforce.

This full-time position is for a fixed term period expiring on 29 February 2020. However, prior to this date our service contract will be reviewed for consideration of a further extension or to be made permanent.

In order to apply you must be a registered health professional with a current practicing certificate and competent experience in mental health assessment, treatment and therapy.

The position offers the opportunity to develop the role within the prison health team as well as developing the service region-wide, with strong organisational and clinical support from your employer.

For more role specific information, contact David Bradley, General Manager, on (04) 560 5423

Please complete an application form from our website‘s employment section quoting reference V042 before 9.00am, Friday, 31 May 2019

We greatly appreciate the time and effort taken to submit your individual application. However, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Mental Health Clinician, Upper Hutt

V041 MH Clinician – Corrections May 2019

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN, RIMUTAKA AND AROHATA PRISONS

Clinical Psychologist, Psychotherapist, OT, Psychiatric Nurse

  • Role based at Rimutaka and Arohata Prisons, Upper Hutt
  • Competitive, market-based remuneration package
  • Challenging and rewarding role, with a service development component

Pact is a major provider of community-based mental health services across Southland, Otago, West Coast and the Lower North Island. We are seeking an experienced health professional with a solid track record to deliver the Improving Mental Health Service within prison sites.

As a champion of the service, you will provide clinical mental health assessments, planning and treatment to offenders who experience a mental illness. In this role you will deliver mental health training workshops for the corrections health teams and wider workforce.

This full-time position is for a fixed term period expiring on 29 February 2020. However, prior to this date our service contract will be reviewed for consideration of a further extension or to be made permanent.

In order to apply you must be a registered health professional with a current practicing certificate and competent experience in mental health assessment, treatment and therapy.

The position offers the opportunity to develop the role within the prison health team as well as developing the service region-wide, with strong organisational and clinical support from your employer.

For more role specific information, contact David Bradley, General Manager, on (04) 560 5423

Please complete an application form from our website‘s employment section quoting reference V041 before 9.00am, Friday, 31 May 2019.

We greatly appreciate the time and effort taken to submit your individual application. However, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Call to strengthen the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill

NZAP Press Release, May 2019

“The New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists stand with other professional organisations to support the government’s Zero Carbon bill and the commission to monitor and set standards of greenhouse gases. We ask that the government announce a Climate Crisis and shorten the goal for Zero Carbon to 10 years.” says Lynne Holdem, of the New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists.

The timing and necessity of lowering carbon emissions is vital for the stabilisation of weather patterns and to sustain life on our planet. As reported by the recent United Nations, the world has approximately 12 years to limit the warming of the planet to 1.5 degrees Celsius. After this the environmental damage will be catastrophic.

“Often people are faced with overwhelming feelings when it comes to climate change, which, if left unchecked can lead to denial, inaction, and eventually despair at ever being able to change the situation. However, becoming politically active, joining an environmental organisation, making lifestyle changes are within the reach of everyone” said Holdem.

“As Psychotherapists, we are familiar with the negative effects of denial and overwhelm which are often seen in clinical situations. However, facing the truth will enable us to mobilise our anxiety in a positive way to produce change. The necessary ingredient for this to happen is being able to become aware of what is happening and talk with others about what we understand and feel. When we find connection together, we receive energy from each other. This can engage our will and create the political, social and personal change that a crisis requires” said Holdem.

“It’s good for our mental health as well as the environment to face reality and take action” she added.

 

Lynne Holdem

NZAP Public Issues

Ph: 027480 3523

Lynneholdem@gmail.com

 

Call for psychotherapists to talk about countertransference experiences

Are you a psychotherapist working with individuals who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder?

My name is Kristin Reilly and I am a Clinical Psychology Doctoral student at the University of Auckland.

As part of my research, I will be interviewing therapists about their experience of countertransference when working with clients who have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Your experience will contribute to training in this area.

The interview will take between 50 and 90 minutes and will be conducted in a location of your choice.

I am seeking psychotherapists with at least 3 years’ experience as a psychotherapist.

For more information, please contact Kristin Reilly at: krei739@aucklanduni.ac.nz

This study is being conducted by Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student, Kristin Reilly (krei739@aucklanduni.ac.nz) and is supervised by Dr Claire Cartwright (c.cartwright@auckland.ac.nz) at The University of Auckland.

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 7th June 2018 for three years. Reference number 021316.

Finding Compassion in a Dark Day – NZAP press release

15 March 2019

New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists (NZAP) acknowledge the shock and grief of the Moslem communities of Aotearoa and affected communities of Christchurch.  Particularly we wish to acknowledge the suffering of the families of the forty New Zealand citizens who have had their lives cut short and the trauma of the helpers and witnesses.

“While recognising the violence of this shocking incident, and sharing in the community of grief, it is important to call on the generous and loving aspects of our humanity. Let’s hope journalists, politicians and all New Zealanders active on social media, focus on the safety and comfort of the survivors, the heroism of the police, the compassion of St Johns medics and citizens who came to help, rather than the lives and ideas of perpetrators of this crime. Copy cat crimes can be a risk following events of this kind,” said Lynne Holdem, Public Issues spokesperson for NZAP.

Guidelines prepared by the Public Affairs of the American Psychoanalytic Association show the way to reduce such risks, continued Holdem.  https://www.reportingonmassshootings.org/

“Socially isolated individuals, preoccupied with resentment or hatred and wanting to gain “celebrity status” can be influenced by media coverage that gives exposure to the perpetrators and focuses on  details of the shooting.  Young men who are struggling with thoughts of suicide and homicide may use news reports and video to feed their own shadowy fantasies.” Holdem added. 

“We are generally a compassionate and peace loving people and lets hope we remain this way. When communities reach out to isolated people on our margins, they become safer as they feel more belonging and more connection to others. It is easy, when we aren’t threatened, to be kind and hold awareness of the needs of others and treat other people with respect. When under stress, or up against polarising views, it is much harder not to be reactive or retributive, and to hold to our values of good will peace and justice. 

Courageous Taranaki tangata whenua, under the severest of threats from colonising forces, remained strong and committed to non-violence. In March 1880 as the government prepared its attack on Parihaka, Te Whiti o Rongomai said  ‘Though some, in darkness of heart, seeing their land ravished, might wish to take arms and kill the aggressors, I say it must not be.’ Let’s remember Te Whiti, in these dark days. 

Lynne Holdem

Public Issues Portfolio

New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists

lynneholdem@gmail.com

Mobile: 0274803523

Part time counsellor, Well Elder, Wellington

Counsellor position description – Wellington February 2019

We are looking for a new appointment to work across Wellington and Porirua area as part of a team of three contracted counsellors. 

Applications to janetr@wellelder.nz by 5pm on Monday 11 March 2019

Please provide letter and CV

www.wellelder.nz for information, enquiries to 04 380 2440

Position Description

Purpose of Position

To provide high quality, professional counselling for individuals, couples, families, and groups as scheduled by WellElder. This includes assessment, short-term counselling, the fostering of client self-understanding and resourcefulness, and the ensuring of client safety and confidentiality, and appropriate referrals and follow ups.

To practise in a way which upholds WellElder’s values and goals and demonstrates an awareness of the needs of older people, Maori and people of a range of cultures.

To be part of WellElder team and participate in regular staff meetings and development, and input to policy, Board meetings and events as able.

The responsibilities of this position may change over time as the organisation responds to changing organisational and client need.

Accountable to:  WellElder Clinical Leader and Manager. 

Hours of Work: WellElder is open Tuesday to Thursdays, with some availability for home visits and groups on other days.

It is expected the contractor will make themselves available for one day a week, preferably Tuesdays, with some flexibility to extend if necessary.

Place of work: A combination of our counselling room at Newtown, and Johnsonville Community Centre and Pember House in Porirua.

Personal attributes:

  • Interested in working with older people.
  • Good communication skills, and flexible approaches to meeting client need.
  • Maturity and integrity in treating others with respect.
  • Excellent organisational and time management skills.
  • A willingness to continually learn and develop.
  • Ability to work independently and also as part of a team.
  • Interested in working less than full time. 

Qualifications and requirements:

  • A current NZAC or NZAP Practising Certificate and a knowledge, understanding and commitment to professional standards and ethics.
  • Training and experience in counselling, and group work.
  • A driver’s licence and the use of a car, as up to a half of counselling sessions take place in clients’ homes.
  • Ability to attend and participate in monthly staff meetings (usually in Wellington.)
  • Accurate and up-to-date record-keeping.
  • Competent Microsoft Outlook calendar use for scheduling appointments.
  • Participation in regular supervision with a qualified supervisor.
  • An awareness of Health and Safety practices in workplaces.
  • Hold Professional Indemnity Insurance.

Vacancies: Lecturer, Psychotherapy Programmes, AUT

We are seeking Lecturers who will aid the delivery of teaching and learning experiences for students enrolled on psychotherapy programmes, engage in research and enhance the Discipline’s capacity for postgraduate research and supervision, and provide leadership to and linkages with the national and international psychotherapy community. The Lecturer acts as a facilitator for student learning, delivering high quality psychotherapy teaching and learning experiences on-campus and within community and health service environments. They actively contribute to the critical study of psychotherapy and nurture future scholars and clinicians. They offer experience, innovation and leadership to the psychotherapy community. Effective performance will result in maximising students’ potential, enhancing the research profile of psychotherapy and enhancing the critical and innovative capacity of the discipline nationally and internationally.

For further information, including the position description, and to apply, please see the following:

https://careers.aut.ac.nz/academic?page=0

A psychotherapist speaks from both sides of the couch

In this news article psychotherapist Lynn Charlton talks about youth suicide and her own difficult passage through depression during adolescence and early adulthood. She reveals the healing she achieved through undertaking a long term psychotherapy. Lynn makes a case for long term therapy when lifestyle changes and brief interventions do not reach the parts of us that need to be known, embraced and healed. Hope can be lost when short term interventions are seen as the only or best methodologies when a relational, psychodynamic or more holistic approach is needed.

NZAP’s submission to the Mental Health Inquiry

The NZAP submission for the Mental Health Inquiry has now been finalised: NZAP Submission to Mental Health Addictions Inquiry (PDF 1.5 MB). Please feel free to share this with friends and colleagues.

Many thanks to everybody who participated in preparing this impressive document – many members have been involved in its creation. Thanks in particular to Lynne Holdem and John Farnsworth for pulling it all together to create such a comprehensive and coherent piece of writing.

We all look forward to hearing the results of the Inquiry in due course.

Speaking out for mental health and young people

13 Reasons How We Can Help Young People Survive and Thrive (DOCX 30 KB)

“Let 13 Reasons Why turn to 13 Reasons How to make a difference to the wellbeing of our young people. These could be made a priority in this election year. We could make a big change in the terrible statistics of youth suicides in New Zealand and to the overall mental wellbeing of all young people” said New Zealand Association of Psychotherapists (NZAP) spokesperson, Lynne Holdem.

“We have been watching 13 Reasons Why showing the hazards of navigating adolescence in 2017 while we could help our real adolescents travel their own troubled waters to safer shores,” said Holdem. She asked NZAP members what they would prioritise in this year’s budget to save and enhance the lives of NZ youth.

NZAP members asked all political parties to consider the following:

  1. Mental health services funded to do the job properly: to offer talk therapies, not just medication or a night in respite care, and then send them on their way (People’s Mental Health Report). Distressed young people can be taught skills for emotional regulation and mindfulness DBT in one to one sessions or in groups. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) clinicians need to work with parents as well to support changes in the environment around the vulnerable young person. Health dollars allocated to 15-19 year olds is one third of allocation to 60-64 year olds. We could share health dollars more fairly as younger people do not need as much spent on physical health but badly need good mental health and addiction services.
  1. A youth-focused space in each city, to provide a safe, welcoming environment, a place of belonging, easy access to counselling support, development opportunities and youth-specific health services” (Whangarei Youth Space). Offer community education to value our young people and invest in their future well-being.
  2. Health-wise schools: a health hub with social worker, counsellor, and nurses in every secondary school treating the increasing numbers of anxious and self-harming adolescents. Add professionals to work with their family members so the adolescent and their family understand each other better.
  3. Relationship and sexuality education, for all NZ secondary schools, by well trained “youth friendly” educators, that is sex-positive and gives students the ability to critically think about sexual attraction, consent, ethics, relationships, the body, gender, pornography and the online environment. Teach the skills of resilience and wellbeing: mindfulness and breathing, and relationships – how they are formed and how they can be broken kindly. Implement restorative justice practices with anti-bullying and emotional development education for teachers.
  4. Parenting support to educate parents about the teenage brain, empathic listening, validation and being there when teens are “falling apart” or “losing it” (Family Connections).
  5. Support Key to Life, Youthline and other community organisations, so good counsellors and other peer supports are available to youth while providing relationship training to the volunteers, as well as initiatives like The Low Down.
  6. Community belonging: let team sports, kapa haka, music, drama, dance, yoga, martial arts and other such groups develop emotional and social skills, and increase connection and resilience in children, youth and young adults. Connected communities, where neighbours know neighbours, welcome strangers and provide social belonging and connection are harbors of personal and community well-being (Community Taranaki).
  7. Lower the voting age to 16: we need to listen and respect the views of young leaders in public conversations and lowering the voting age to 16 may be a way to empower that constituency and achieve a fairer age based access to resources and opportunities. Have a Youth Parliament every year.
  8. Whanau Ora services resourced to heal generational trauma of whanau and iwi, to strengthen identity and resilience in rangatahi and young people. Parenting courses available to young parents to strengthen identitity and well-being that are based in Maori values and practices (Hoki ki te Rito –Ohomairanga Trust).
  9. Addiction services available to everyone that needs them so people with adverse childhood experiences who seek comfort in drugs can address their trauma and get free of the downward spiral of addiction. This is especially important when young men are leaving jail and trying to integrate back into the community.
  10. Early intervention: heal relationships in family and whanau by intervening at the first sign of domestic violence or child distress, not waiting until the situation is so bad that the children need to be uplifted. Keep children with parents or hapu wherever possible by resourcing grandparents and other kin when they need to take children into care.
  11. Attachment: provide informed early interventions for parents of new babies during their first 1000 days, focused on understanding relationships and developing empathy for children, not just behavior management techniques. Make “Circle of Security” parenting available to families who need help to create security for their infants. Provide supportive parenting courses to bring commitment to change.
  12. A longer election cycle to give politicians the courage to address homelessness, the increasing rich/poor class divide, earthquakes and weather vulnerabilities, and house price hikes that all create mental ill-health and split apart families.

Holdem says she wants to see harbours of community kindness, life-saver experiences and lighthouses of hope for young people to help them navigate adolescence’s tricky and troubled waters.

 

Lynne Holdem

NZAP Public Issues Portfolio

Lynneholdem@gmail.com